Roaring 20s: Let’s Get This Bread

I self-identify as a millennial. I, therefore, speak in memes from time to time.

And by ‘time to time’, I do mean most of the time. But as with life and how it soldiers on, I’m aware enough to realise that my meme knowledge is aging, and no longer can I see a new Internet fad and automatically understand what it means. I’m not too sad about it, seeing as I have other prirorities now other that being ‘cool with the kids’, but it’s still a little upsetting when my thoughts occasionally stray towards it.

Anyway! Yesterday, I re-posted a list consisting of 25 Things a twentysomething should do before, well, they hit thirty. I’m in my mid-twenties and am in no rush to reach my third decade of living, nor am I dragging my feet for the good ol’ days. I actually love my life right now. The only problem, however, is that I have no clear goals to speak of (aside from, you know, eventually getting promoted at work or something like that). And so, The List was born!

  1. Do something scary.
  2. Learn to cook.
  3. Travel alone.
  4. Ride a plane.
  5. Party all night.

…and so on. I won’t list them all out again; you can read them here if you wish to take a look.

Aside from being a millennial, I’m also a Sagittarius so yeah I can’t stay in one place for too long. Which is why! I can cross off some things from that mighty list above.

LiberaTarts Likes to Travel

It’s Day 1 of this not-quite-a-challenge and already I am itching to tick off a few points from that list. Continue below if you want to read about it.

#3 Travel Alone

Solo-travel was something I embraced during my year abroad in Japan. Around late spring to late summer of 2017, you could find me dragging my little cabin-sized wheeled suitcase from ドン・キホーテ (a discount chain store) around the Kansai, Chugoku, and Kyushu regions.

I learnt so much about myself as a person, travelling alone. I’ve learnt that I much preferred having one hundred percent control over the itinerary, and that asking strangers to take pictures of you isn’t that frightening at all! Always go for the family tourists or the ones who look like retirees.

#4 Ride A Plane

Clearly I’ve no patience (or the stomach) for long-distance sea travel. I flew on a plane to get to the countries I’ve been to!

gif of the view from a plane
travelling over Belfast

#9 Change The Script

Take an extended vacation to a new town (or country!) where you don’t know anybody.

Source

I can’t say it was entirely my idea, but moving to England at the age of six with my family kind of counts as “changing the script”… right? I sure as hell didn’t know anyone; making friends as a shy, brown-skinned introvert was difficult enough without all the drama that was happening in my family. Suffice to say, stability was not A Thing during my childhood and early teens.

#15 Go Overseas

I’ve semi-permanently moved to China. I live, work, and spend all of my free time in Chengdu, where I’m based. Despite the chance to travel during the Spring Festival / Lunar New Year holidays, I decided to stay in Sichuan so that I can fully immerse myself in this new chapter of my life. So, have I been overseas? As a British-Filipino, the answer is an absolute hells yeah.


Over to you: What can you check off from the list? Tell me in the comments below!

Roaring 20s: Things To Do When You’re A Twentysomething

I understand that we’re in the middle of February, but… HAPPY 2020, my dear readers! It’s not only a new year but a new decade, too. Definitely worth a little party popper if you’re lucky enough to have some to hand.

Living in China, I am fortunate enough to celebrate the new year twice: once on the 1st of January, and a second time during the Chinese Spring Festival twenty-five days later on the 25th of January. The party atmosphere has long-since died down, however, not because I’m perpetually late in documenting it but because of the novel coronavirus outbreak from Wuhan province.

I wouldn’t want to spend too much time on that, though, so let’s move on!

I don’t want to get into specifics, nevertheless I think it’s worth noting that I am smack-dab in the middle of my twenties. And to play into that whole ‘searching for a purpose’ stereotype, I am – quite frankly, searching for a purpose. Aside from maintaining my general wellbeing, going to work, and socialising (online, mostly) with my friends and family, I don’t really have any plans in life.

What to do? What to do?

LiberaTarts Reads a LifeHack: Things to Do in Your Twenties

Like with most things, I turned to Google for help and searched “things to do when you’re in your mid-twenties”. It’s a clunky search term, but Google does what Google does best and it spat out several interesting pages. Leaving behind the generic advice to avoid drama and invest into a 401K (whatever that is, I’m not American), I found this lovely list on LifeHack that I must, must, must dip into.

25 Things You Must Do In Your Twenties

  1. Do something scary.
  2. Learn to cook.
  3. Travel alone.
  4. Ride a plane.
  5. Party all night.
  6. Take a risk.
  7. Enlighten yourself.
  8. Play a sport.
  9. Change the script.
  10. Reunite with an old friend.
  11. Drop the “I’m busy” farce.
  12. Pay off your debt.
  13. Get to know your family.
  14. Re-read the classics.
  15. Go overseas.
  16. Volunteer for a cause.
  17. Cut the clutter.
  18. Fall in love.
  19. Write a letter.
  20. See your favorite band live.
  21. Sleep under the stars.
  22. Perform for a crowd.
  23. Take a road trip with your best friend or partner.
  24. Start a garden.
  25. Find your passion.

(Source: Daniel Wallen)

Okay, number twenty-five is very wishy-washy and already I am scoffing at the idea. But I will stick to this list (at least for the next few months, haha!) and let’s see how I get on. Given the tone of the list, I can tell it comes from a very traditional American experience – assuming you can drive or know someone who can do so for a road trip, or not having had the chance to leave the country you where you were born, etc. As the daughter of an OFW, I literally moved continents at the young age of six and have not stopped since.

Also, some of these things on the list are not very SMART worthy. What is SMART, you may ask? It’s an acronym to help answer competency-based questions during interviews: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Time-Based. It’s also an acronym that I use to create lessons plans – yay for ESL teaching! Anyway, goals listed above like “learn to cook” and “cut the clutter” are all quite vague, but I suppose figuring out how to be specific would be part of the process.

OF COURSE I’m in no way obligated to complete this list. I do have some autonomy, after all, despite needing lists and other forms of productivity tools to somehow move my life along. Come join my quest into checking off this entire list… or not. Up to you!