3-2-1 Countdown: Classroom “Cheats” I’d Stake My Life On

The 3-2-1 Countdown series is a collection of posts, reflecting on the dual influences of my Philippine heritage and my British citizenship. It’s not meant to be too serious as politicking is not my strong suit, but instrospection sure is!

I was born and raised in the Philippines, moved to the UK and became a British citizen, before moving back and forth between the two countries like a yo-yo.

Source: Habits of a British-Filipino

Kindergarten, middle school, high school, Sixth Form… you name it, I’ve most likely have tried it. Such is the result of having to move around a lot growing up. It’s not necessarily a bad thing (I crave variety in life because I get bored easy), nor is it a good thing. But let’s focus on the good!

Here are some classroom ‘cheats’ that I feel are national secrets. “How so?” you may ask, and I’ll tell you! It’s because whenever I performed these tricks at school, my friends and classmates would look at me and be like, “Dude, what are you doing.”

mentally, my mind is booking it out of that situation

My response, usually, was to clam up and just get on with my work. I was a studious child. Some would even say nerd or swot like it was a bad thing.

Anyway, here are some tips and tricks I picked up as I moved between various educational institutions. Full disclaimer, though: I’m not claiming that these tricks originated from these countries, just that I was currently living in these places and it seemed to be general knowledge when I learned them.

Makes sense? Okay, let’s go!

3 Tricks I Learned in the Philippines

How many days there are in a given month

Clench both your hands into fists, as if you’re about to throw punches or making the ASL sign for the letters ‘a’ or ‘s’. Notice the valleys and peaks of your knuckles and wonder, “What on earth is the author talking about?”

Let me explain.

I’ll never forget how many days there are in any given month.

Say that January is 1, February is 2 and so on, the numbers in blue are the months with 31 days and the numbers in red are the months with 30 days – except for February, of course, which has 28 (or 29 if a leap year). Check your knuckles yourself and see that I’m right!

It’s not as simple as saying to yourself that each month alternating between 30 and 31 days – which would have been totally easier, I’m sure – but them pesky Roman emperors Julius and Augustus ruined the pattern* and was like, “Let’s commemorate our greatness by adding ourselves to the calendar!” and thus, the months of July and August (months 7 and 8, respectively, coded in blue) became a part of our lives.

Quick multiplication for numbers six up to nine

Did you hate memorising your times tables as a kid? Yeah, me too.

My relationship with math is like a love/hate relationship. I love how it’s the same (pretty much) in whichever country you learn it in; I hate how difficult it gets once you reach a certain level. I may have peaked during algebra class, way back when I was still in mandatory education, and kind of fell hardwhen we started learning statistice.

Regardless, this little hand trick regarding the six to nine (technically ten, but who needs tricks learning how to count in ten?!) times tables earned me a few curious looks when I transferred to a UK school. I still stuck by it like my fingertips are glued together!

Each finger corresponds to a number, e.g. pinky finger = 6, middle finger = 8. Say you’re working out 7×8, like in the picture above. Put your fingers together and these fingers will create a boundary: the fingers below including the boundary line indicate the number of tens in the product you’re searching for, i.e. for this instance, it’s five fingers which equal to five tens… 50. Next, you need to multiply the fingers above the boundary line together.

“Wait, more multiplication?! Say it ain’t so!” you may say.

Don’t make this weird, I’m just trying to make maths easier. Or more difficult. It depends on the person.

Okay, so the next step is this: there are three fingers on the left hand and two fingers on the right. This means that you have to multiply 3 by 2, which is 6. Add this to the 50 from before, and you get 56. What’s 7×8=? The answer is 56.

Knowing if a number is a multiple of nine

The nine times table was the easiest table to learn after the 1s, 10s, and 2s. Why? Because the product (the answer) always, when the digits are added together, make up the number nine.

1 x 9 = 9

2 x 9 = 18 [1+8=9]

3 x 9 = 27 [2+7=9]

…and so on. Easy enough to remember when checking answers!

2 Tips I Picked Up in the UK

Working out the nine times table

Jumping from those maths tricks above, there’s one that I learned in the UK that was shown to me as a kid but I never really decided to bother with because at that point, I had memorised the necessary numbers and would frantically check the digits in the products to see if they added up to nine. Regardless, I still get a chuckle from this trick whenever the kids I tutored for my part-time job back at university were working on their maths homework.

This trick is pretty self-explanatory. Working out 9×7=? Count, from the left, to your seventh finger and hold it down. The number of fingers to the left is the tens, the fingers on the right are the units. The answer is 63.

(6 + 3 = 9, just FYI.)

L is for my left hand side

I wouldn’t want to presume that learning one’s Left from one’s Right is simple – the left is the left and the right is the right, right? – but apparently some people, especially young kids, find it difficult to differentiate. I suppose things like the changeability of direction depending on perspective is too much for the young’uns to spare too much brain power over. And so things like “L is for my left hand side” came into fruition, I guess!

L is for my left hand side, okay?!

1 Thing I Learned From Somewhere Else

A is for America. E is for England.

on how to spell the colour ‘grey’/’gray’

English is my strongest language. I can make basic, everyday conversation in Tagalog, can seemingly understand the dialect spoken in my hometown like it’s in my soul but only if I’m in that town, and I have a passable understanding of Japanese because I studied it at university. But for the life of me, I couldn’t figure out how to spell the colour grey until I gave up and Googled it way later in my life that I should have.

I’m talking late teens, here.

As tough and seemingly lawless the English language can be, there’s no wonder that there are many so-called rules and mnemonics that help with spelling that are taught to kids in elementary school. Most of them have been debunked – cough*I-before-E-except-after-C*cough – but I stick by the quote above like fly on flypaper. It hasn’t steered me wrong, yet.


Over to you guys: Do you have any classroom tips or tricks that you swore by – or still swear by, even now into adulthood? Assuming your a grown-up. Students are welcome to comment, too! (This is why you can never assume things on the Internet!)

3-2-1 Countdown: Habits of a British-Filipino

I was born and raised in the Philippines, moved to the UK and became a British citizen, before moving back and forth between the two countries like a yo-yo. I also took a Migration and Belonging module at university, yet I still don’t understand how to categorize my situation.

Anyway, here are some habits that I personally ascribe to either identity.

3 Filipino Mannerisms I Refuse To Shake

Using the tsinelas

I can’t help it! I can’t subscribe to the idea of using shoes you wear constantly outdoors indoors. I also don’t understand the concept of walking around barefoot at home – I don’t care if the entirety of your house is carpeted and, frankly, using a fluffy slipper is weird AF when it’s not Christmastime.

Also, what do you do when you just got out of the shower? Track your wet feet along a carpet that outdoor shoes may or may not have tread across, or dare to get your fluffy slipper wet?

I say “slippers” all the time and all my non-Filipino friends get concerned.

Eating rice… all the time

It’s not a proper meal without rice.

– me to my friends, on more than one occasion

I can have rice for breakfast: egg fried rice with bacon lardons and random vegetables I feel like eating.

I can have rice for lunch: rice and oven-roasted pork with a side of green beans.

I can even have rice for dinner: rice and peppered mackerel, on its own because there’s only so much vegetable consumption I can tolerate.

Listening to OPM

Look, I like The Beatles and Adele and Andrew Lloyd Webber as much as the next person, but nothing beats the heart-wrenching soul-filled crooning belters by Regine Velasquez, Rivermaya, and Ice Seguerra (formerly known as Aiza Seguerra, just FYI).

Not gonna lie though, I might be ageing myself with the Filipino artists I’ve chosen because I have not chosen any young, popular acts from this decade.

2 British Habits I’ve Learned To Love

Drinking tea at any given opportunity

Would you believe I only started to love drinking English tea this autumn? I adore Japanese matcha, but…. black teas, green teas? Nope, not having any!

That is until I tried Earl Grey and fell in love. I have two packs of Twinings Earl Grey in the kitchen cupboard and I’m bringing them with me to China somehow. (Yes, I do understand the irony of bringing British tea to China… where tea originates from.)

Had a good day? Celebrate with tea.

A terrible day at work? Cheer yourself up with tea.

Bored at home? Make some tea.

A good queue

Bus queue. ATM queue. Netflix queue. British people like to queue and so do I.

It takes the stress out of constantly wondering “is it my turn yet?” and it provides a practical way doing things – at the very least you can easily get through a queue if you wish to cross into the other side. Not so much with a crowd of non-queuers.

1 Thing That Can Be Both

Complaining

Given the state of British politics – Brexit, anyone? – and what seems to be the inherent need to follow the norm, the act of complaining is a habit that is pervasive in both cultures. Or at the very least, it’s what I’ve noticed as I lived in both England and the Philippines: I can’t count the number of times I’ve overheard someone halfheartedly complaining about the weather or wholeheartedly expressing their frustration about a late bus. The feeling is universal, and you can fight me on this.

I complain all the time. And whether its a British thing or a Filipino thing or even just a Me Thing? Well, it’s arguable.


Chime in like Brendon Urie: Do any of these things ring true with you? Let me know in the comments!

BELFAST Travel Guide

Travelling to Belfast

Belfast is the capital city of Northern Ireland and has a population of approximately 340,200 people. The city is well-known for building the famously tragic boat Ship of Dreams, the Titanic. Belfast is not to be confused with Dublin, which is the capital city of the Republic of Ireland. See the map below for further clarification.

map of ireland, differentiating northern ireland and the republic of ireland

The easiest way to get to Northern Ireland – or Belfast, more specifically – is by flying. Personally, I flew from London Stansted to Belfast International Airport, although there are two other airports within Northern Ireland: George Best Belfast City Airport and City of Derry Airport.

You can also take the train if you’re travelling from England, Wales, or Scotland. The trip, however, will be split partway to include the ferry trip to Ireland. There are also direct coaches to Dublin serviced by the National Express if you wish to have a cheaper alternative to planes and trains.

Where to stay in Belfast

As a solo traveller, I cannot recommend hotels unless you are travelling with two other people.

Belfast has a lot of hostels on offer, all within walking distance to the main city centre. Prices can range between £10-£15 per night at a hostel; I stayed at Lagan Backpackers for 2 nights and didn’t pay more than £26 total, and the place had a TV with a Netflix subscription, newly refurbished bathrooms, and they even offered a free breakfast to those who opt-in!

If you’re willing to spend a little more for privacy, then I would suggest Airbnb as an alternative.

Getting around Belfast

  • walking – the farthest I walked from one tourist destination to another was 20 minutes
  • by bike – Belfast bikes cost £1 per half hour
  • by bus – Belfast has THREE different bus services and I highly suggest using the Translink journey planner to navigate
  • by train – the main train stations in Belfast are Great Victoria Street Station and Belfast Central Station
  • by taxi / uber / car rental

Things to do in Belfast

I highly recommend just typing in “things to do” on Google Maps and see if any of the options offered are compatible with your interests. Getting into the habit of making bookmarks and lists on Google Maps is helpful in planning daily itineraries and, sometimes, choosing a hostel or Airbnb that is most convenient for you, the traveller.

Here is a list of places I visited within the Belfast city:

  • Ulster Museum
  • Belfast Botanic Gardens
  • The Palm House
  • The Tropical Ravine
  • Belfast Peace Wall
  • The Big Fish, Salmon of Knowledge
  • Belfast City Hall
  • Belfast Castle
  • Cavehill (I climbed to the very top!)

I also went on day trips, where I visited:

  • Strangford, where I spent the morning at Winterfell Castle and had lunch at The Cuan (where Sean Bean and all the other Game of Thrones actors stayed during their shoots!)
  • Bushmills, where I ate my lunch on the Giant’s Causeway steps and spent the afternoon walking the trail around the Shepherd’s Steps
reading a book, Homo Deus by Yuval Noah Harari, on the giant's causeway
from September’s reading challenge

What to expect from Belfast

Expect the unexpected.

an ancient proverb, probably

Belfast – and Northern Ireland, in general – is a super friendly place. The bus drivers are really easy to speak with and they are more than happy to help a lost little tourist. I honestly believe the locals are psychic because they always know where you want to go and will just gently nudge you towards the right direction. Everyone I spoke with, from the waitresses to the random man I befriended as I walked the Cavehill nature trail, was softspoken and kindhearted. Belfast is brilliant!

Lastly, expect to receive some Northern Ireland banknotes. They are different to the ones in circulation around England, but they are still Sterling notes and can be exchanged for Bank of England notes at any bank in the UK.

And in conclusion…

I spent an approximate total of £270, including travel, accommodation, and food. Belfast is an amazing place with a lot of history and great architecture. The food is good, the people even good-er, and the only downside was the confusing bus network. 10/10 will recommend for other solo travellers to visit!

Northern Ireland Adventure: A Day of Culture

I mentioned in my previous post that I plan to go to the Botanical Gardens and the Ulster Museum, and perhaps Belfast Castle if I had the time in the afternoon. Naively, I figured that today was just going to my like yesterday, full of fun and adventure and wonder, then I realised that I only booked two nights at the Lagan Backpackers and have booked, for the remainder of my stay here in Belfast, an airbnb conveniently located across the other side of the city.

Why did I book an airbnb, you may ask? To be honest, I severely underestimated how lovely Lagan Backpacker’s was and thought hm, wouldn’t it be great to spend a night or two sleeping sounds without strangers snoring in the same room. It’s a legitimate thought, which I am slightly thankful for right now, but not during the 45-minute walk – with my suitcase! – as I traversed Belfast city in my pursuit of some privacy.

All throughout the day, I was concerned about changing accommodation from a hostel to an airbnb; it put a little bit of a downer on my mood, but it’s not like I could complain too much as I did put myself in this situation. Both types of accommodation have their positives and negatives, after all. In all honesty, I just didn’t want to spend money on two bus tickets or an uber, so walking for 45 minutes was a necessary evil that I conquered this afternoon.

What a day! But let’s focus on the good parts, such as the Botanical Garden and the Ulster Museum.

LiberaTarts Sits in a Rose Garden

After a full English breakfast, I walked fifteen or so minutes to the Botanical Gardens where I encountered a lot of people on their morning commute. I had a brief flash of “oh, this was me two weeks ago,” obviously referring to my summer internship that is now (thank goodness!) over and done with. I am so not suited for office work in a small company, especially if you were the only Asian.

The Botanical Garden is a very beautiful place to be, and I sure hope that the people who lived nearby realised how lucky they are to have such a well-maintained park at their disposal.

“[There are] assorted tropical plants, giant bird feeders, a rose garden, an alpine garden, mature trees, flower beds and sculptures,” according to the Belfast City’s government website.

I only visited the tropical plants and the rose garden, as it was too cold that morning to do much wandering around… hence the reason why I sat in the rose garden for a good chunk of the morning, reading my book and contemplating the very nature of humanity.

an orange rose bush with a bee buzzing around, flying towards the camera
buzz off, human (ノ→ܫ←)ノ

In hindsight, wearing a bright mustard yellow shirt was a bad idea to wear to a flower garden. The bees kept buzzing around me – one even landed on my sleeve – and I was helpless on how to properly react. Intellectually, I knew that bees were good for pollination and the they are important for the environment and the ecosystem, etc. However, the simple and more anxious-of-nature side of me was panicking because what if that bee hurts me.

Thankfully, the bee did not hurt me.

The Palm House, the Tropical Ravine, and Me

Literally two minutes away from each other sits the Palm House, the garden’s greenhouse, and the Tropical Ravine, which I suppose it also the garden’s greenhouse but so much newer and has its own little waterfall feature inside. I didn’t take any pictures though, so shame on me. The Palm House, on the other hand, was built during the Victorian Era, back when British society was colonising expanding its reaches across the world and people were super interested in foreign plants  – and ferns, for some reason.

It’s not that big of a greenhouse, but the fact that I was blown away by the sheer number of plants in that place was amazing in and of itself. I love visiting greenhouses – it’s like stepping through the front door I’m transported back to the climate in the Philippines and I get a little nostalgic. There’s something about warm humidity that gives me sensational flashbacks of my childhood (which is so weird because I spent all my time indoors reading fiction books!).

The down side of being inside a greenhouse? It seems like the very building aims at your head with its dropping water droplets.

The upside? I was wearing a hat and it was so damn pretty in there that I didn’t care even if I wasn’t wearing a hat.

a panoramic image of The Palm House front door
a panoramic image of The Palm House front door

FUN STORY:

The greenhouse officially opens at 10am and I was the first person in that day because, unobservant old me, just swanned through the open doors like I owned the place. It didn’t matter that all the other visitors / tourists with their suitcases were mingling nearby waiting for the building to open; I just walked in, all assured, and started taking pictures.

FOLLOW UP FUN STORY:

Walking around with a purpose while I panic in my head is a habit of mine and earlier today while I was at the Ulster Museum, I power-walked towards a set of glass doors thinking it was unlocked and – as you may have guessed already – it wasn’t accessible by the public and I had to turn around. What’s funny about this, aside from the whole oopsie-daisy, silly me situation, was the fact that a lady in her 40s was following me thinking I knew for sure that those doors led to the outside worlds.

We both giggled over our misjudgments. I wholly blame my glasses and their lack of usefulness in reading signs from a great distance.

Speaking of the Ulster Museum…

LiberaTarts Gets Her Culture Shades On

This museum blew my mind away. I didn’t expect to spend so much time inside that building as much as I ended up doing today: I arrived around 11:30, 11:45… and I didn’t leave until 4pm. When I got hungry around lunchtime, I ordered the nicest meal my rumbling stomach could ask for, which was some meatballs and potatoes in this really stodgy, flavourful and all-around delicious creamy sauce and wow was I impressed.

meatballs and potatoes on a plate
today’s special at the Yellow Box, Ulster Museum’s cafe on-site

My visit to the Ulster Museum was split into two parts: the History part, where I brushed up my knowledge of the UK (and more specifically, Ireland) from Neolithic Age up until the late 20th century, and the Art part, where I admired the practical applications of art found within the exhibited ceramics and then stared at a painting of a nude woman for a solid amount of time. I also learned about the intermingled relationship between fashion and feminism, which was just the metaphorical cherry on the cake that was this museum.

painting of a reclining lady in nude

I love the Ulster Museum. 10/10 would recommend to any visitors, especially those with children since one of the reasons why I adore it so much is the fact how 1) accessible it is to handicapped individuals, and 2) the exhibits were made with children and interactivity in mind, as seen by the descriptions printed at eye level and clear signs encouraging people to touch an arrowhead or a silver brooch, and so on.

Today was a long day, both in the good sense and the bad. I am currently writing this post in my new airbnb, so the bad stress from today is all but gone, and looking through the pictures I took today reminded me of all the good memories. Belfast has so much to offer!

Total spend for the day: £11.49 for lunch and a cake, £1 for a magnet souvenir, and £7ish for a craving-induced KFC binge, all equalling to £19.49. Curse you, airbnb, for being within a 5-minute walk to several fastfood joints.


Over to you guys: The Ulster Museum is definitely Top 3 list of museums and art galleries… what are your Top 3? Comment below and we can find out if I’ve been or have plans to go there soon!

Tomorrow, the plan is to go all the way to the northern coast of Northern Ireland and see the Giant’s Causeway. I was reminded of this location by a video I saw today about volcanoes in the museum, and I wanted to make a full day trip to somewhere that isn’t the Belfast city centre. See you all tomorrow, folks!