Northern Ireland Adventure: A Day of Culture

I mentioned in my previous post that I plan to go to the Botanical Gardens and the Ulster Museum, and perhaps Belfast Castle if I had the time in the afternoon. Naively, I figured that today was just going to my like yesterday, full of fun and adventure and wonder, then I realised that I only booked two nights at the Lagan Backpackers and have booked, for the remainder of my stay here in Belfast, an airbnb conveniently located across the other side of the city.

Why did I book an airbnb, you may ask? To be honest, I severely underestimated how lovely Lagan Backpacker’s was and thought hm, wouldn’t it be great to spend a night or two sleeping sounds without strangers snoring in the same room. It’s a legitimate thought, which I am slightly thankful for right now, but not during the 45-minute walk – with my suitcase! – as I traversed Belfast city in my pursuit of some privacy.

All throughout the day, I was concerned about changing accommodation from a hostel to an airbnb; it put a little bit of a downer on my mood, but it’s not like I could complain too much as I did put myself in this situation. Both types of accommodation have their positives and negatives, after all. In all honesty, I just didn’t want to spend money on two bus tickets or an uber, so walking for 45 minutes was a necessary evil that I conquered this afternoon.

What a day! But let’s focus on the good parts, such as the Botanical Garden and the Ulster Museum.

LiberaTarts Sits in a Rose Garden

After a full English breakfast, I walked fifteen or so minutes to the Botanical Gardens where I encountered a lot of people on their morning commute. I had a brief flash of “oh, this was me two weeks ago,” obviously referring to my summer internship that is now (thank goodness!) over and done with. I am so not suited for office work in a small company, especially if you were the only Asian.

The Botanical Garden is a very beautiful place to be, and I sure hope that the people who lived nearby realised how lucky they are to have such a well-maintained park at their disposal.

“[There are] assorted tropical plants, giant bird feeders, a rose garden, an alpine garden, mature trees, flower beds and sculptures,” according to the Belfast City’s government website.

I only visited the tropical plants and the rose garden, as it was too cold that morning to do much wandering around… hence the reason why I sat in the rose garden for a good chunk of the morning, reading my book and contemplating the very nature of humanity.

an orange rose bush with a bee buzzing around, flying towards the camera
buzz off, human (ノ→ܫ←)ノ

In hindsight, wearing a bright mustard yellow shirt was a bad idea to wear to a flower garden. The bees kept buzzing around me – one even landed on my sleeve – and I was helpless on how to properly react. Intellectually, I knew that bees were good for pollination and the they are important for the environment and the ecosystem, etc. However, the simple and more anxious-of-nature side of me was panicking because what if that bee hurts me.

Thankfully, the bee did not hurt me.

The Palm House, the Tropical Ravine, and Me

Literally two minutes away from each other sits the Palm House, the garden’s greenhouse, and the Tropical Ravine, which I suppose it also the garden’s greenhouse but so much newer and has its own little waterfall feature inside. I didn’t take any pictures though, so shame on me. The Palm House, on the other hand, was built during the Victorian Era, back when British society was colonising expanding its reaches across the world and people were super interested in foreign plants  – and ferns, for some reason.

It’s not that big of a greenhouse, but the fact that I was blown away by the sheer number of plants in that place was amazing in and of itself. I love visiting greenhouses – it’s like stepping through the front door I’m transported back to the climate in the Philippines and I get a little nostalgic. There’s something about warm humidity that gives me sensational flashbacks of my childhood (which is so weird because I spent all my time indoors reading fiction books!).

The down side of being inside a greenhouse? It seems like the very building aims at your head with its dropping water droplets.

The upside? I was wearing a hat and it was so damn pretty in there that I didn’t care even if I wasn’t wearing a hat.

a panoramic image of The Palm House front door
a panoramic image of The Palm House front door

FUN STORY:

The greenhouse officially opens at 10am and I was the first person in that day because, unobservant old me, just swanned through the open doors like I owned the place. It didn’t matter that all the other visitors / tourists with their suitcases were mingling nearby waiting for the building to open; I just walked in, all assured, and started taking pictures.

FOLLOW UP FUN STORY:

Walking around with a purpose while I panic in my head is a habit of mine and earlier today while I was at the Ulster Museum, I power-walked towards a set of glass doors thinking it was unlocked and – as you may have guessed already – it wasn’t accessible by the public and I had to turn around. What’s funny about this, aside from the whole oopsie-daisy, silly me situation, was the fact that a lady in her 40s was following me thinking I knew for sure that those doors led to the outside worlds.

We both giggled over our misjudgments. I wholly blame my glasses and their lack of usefulness in reading signs from a great distance.

Speaking of the Ulster Museum…

LiberaTarts Gets Her Culture Shades On

This museum blew my mind away. I didn’t expect to spend so much time inside that building as much as I ended up doing today: I arrived around 11:30, 11:45… and I didn’t leave until 4pm. When I got hungry around lunchtime, I ordered the nicest meal my rumbling stomach could ask for, which was some meatballs and potatoes in this really stodgy, flavourful and all-around delicious creamy sauce and wow was I impressed.

meatballs and potatoes on a plate
today’s special at the Yellow Box, Ulster Museum’s cafe on-site

My visit to the Ulster Museum was split into two parts: the History part, where I brushed up my knowledge of the UK (and more specifically, Ireland) from Neolithic Age up until the late 20th century, and the Art part, where I admired the practical applications of art found within the exhibited ceramics and then stared at a painting of a nude woman for a solid amount of time. I also learned about the intermingled relationship between fashion and feminism, which was just the metaphorical cherry on the cake that was this museum.

painting of a reclining lady in nude

I love the Ulster Museum. 10/10 would recommend to any visitors, especially those with children since one of the reasons why I adore it so much is the fact how 1) accessible it is to handicapped individuals, and 2) the exhibits were made with children and interactivity in mind, as seen by the descriptions printed at eye level and clear signs encouraging people to touch an arrowhead or a silver brooch, and so on.

Today was a long day, both in the good sense and the bad. I am currently writing this post in my new airbnb, so the bad stress from today is all but gone, and looking through the pictures I took today reminded me of all the good memories. Belfast has so much to offer!

Total spend for the day: £11.49 for lunch and a cake, £1 for a magnet souvenir, and £7ish for a craving-induced KFC binge, all equalling to £19.49. Curse you, airbnb, for being within a 5-minute walk to several fastfood joints.


Over to you guys: The Ulster Museum is definitely Top 3 list of museums and art galleries… what are your Top 3? Comment below and we can find out if I’ve been or have plans to go there soon!

Tomorrow, the plan is to go all the way to the northern coast of Northern Ireland and see the Giant’s Causeway. I was reminded of this location by a video I saw today about volcanoes in the museum, and I wanted to make a full day trip to somewhere that isn’t the Belfast city centre. See you all tomorrow, folks!